Oregon Flora Plant Atlas

Author: Oregon Flora Project Dept. Botany & Plant Pathology, Oregon State University (various authors)

The Oregon Plant Atlas allows the user to generate customized plant distribution maps from herbarium specimen and observation data. The default search results displayed are “Flora vouchers”, specimens from the OSU Herbarium and selected vouchers from other herbaria. These serve as reference material for the upcoming Flora of Oregon. Any combination of available specimens or unvouchered observations can be mapped by selecting the appropriate checkboxes.

Visit (website): Oregon Flora Plant Atlas

Guide to Placement of Wood, Boulders and Gravel for Habitat Restoration

Author: ODF/ODFW Date: 2010

This guide has been developed to facilitate the placement of large wood, boulders and gravel in a manner consistent with these principles and regulations in Oregon. These techniques, when done independently or in conjunction with other restoration activities, increase the channel complexity and diversity of habitat necessary to help restore and support a healthy aquatic ecosystem.

Download (Word): Guide to Placement of Wood, Boulders and Gravel for Habitat Restoration (4MB)

Restoring Rare Native Habitats in the Willamette Valley

Author: Campbell, B. Date: 2004

This guide is organized by the four priority habitat types: oak woodlands; wetlands; bottomland hardwood and riparian forests; and grasslands and prairies. A brief discussion of each habitat is followed by restoration considerations and techniques. References or sources of information are denoted by superscript numbers that refer to entries in the bibliography. Restorationists wishing to obtain additional information or delve more deeply into a topic may want to review these references.

Download (PDF): Restoring Rare Native Habitats in the Willamette Valley (2MB)

A Landowner’s Guide for Restoring and Managing Oregon White Oak Habitats

Authors: Vesely, D. and Tucker, G. Date: 2004

The primary purpose of this Guide is to encourage private landowners to conserve, and when appropriate, actively manage Oregon white oaks that already exist on their property, and consider planting additional oaks. In the early chapters of the Guide, we describe some of the uses and benefits of this remarkable tree in hopes of motivating landowners to take action. An introduction to the ecology of the Oregon white oak is included so the reader can better understand how management practices are founded on aspects of the tree’s biology. Later chapters are designed to help landowners develop land management goals and understand the process of natural resource planning.

Download (PDF): A Landowner’s Guide for Restoring and Managing Oregon White Oak Habitats (7MB)

A Guide to Riparian Tree Planting in Southwest Oregon

Authors: Bennett, M. and Ahrens, G. Date: 2007

This publication is a step-by-step guide to riparian tree planting in interior southwest Oregon, including Jackson and Josephine counties and the noncoastal portions of Douglas County. Compared to other parts of western Oregon, this area experiences hotter, drier summers, and lower annual precipitation, which poses unique challenges for the survival and growth of riparian plantings. While some details apply mainly to this region, the principles discussed are broadly applicable to tree-planting projects in riparian areas throughout the Pacific Northwest.

Download (PDF): A Guide to Riparian Tree Planting in Southwest Oregon (2MB)

A Guide to Riparian Tree and Shrub Planting in the Willamette Valley: Steps to Success

Authors: Withrow-Robinson, B., Bennett, M., & Ahrens, G. Date: 2011

This guide describes six steps to help landowners, watershed council members, agency personnel, and others communicate about, plan, and implement successful riparian tree and shrub plantings in the Willamette Valley:
1. Plan your project.
2. Select and obtain plant materials.
3. Prepare the site.
4. Plant your trees right.
5. Take care of the planting.
6. Monitor and learn from results.

Manual and Land Cover Type Descriptions: Oregon Gap Analysis, 1998 Land Cover for Oregon

Author: Killsgaard, C. Date: 1999

In its Acoarse filter@ approach to conservation biology, gap analysis relies on maps of dominant natural land cover types as the most fundamental spatial component of the analysis for terrestrial environments. For the purposes of GAP, most of the land surface of interest (natural) can be characterized by its dominant vegetation. Vegetation patterns are an integrated reflection of the physical and chemical factors that shape the environment of a given land area. They also are determinants for overall biological diversity patterns, and they can be used as a currency for habitat types in conservation evaluations

Download (Word): Manual and Land Cover Type Descriptions: Oregon Gap Analysis, 1998 Land Cover for Oregon (125KB)